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Matthew Blackburn and his friends play eeny-meeny-miny-mo to decide who is "on" in a game of "catches" at Matthew's 7th birthday party at his family's home in Johannesburg, South Africa. Matthew's social group is racially very mixed--a product of the integration that is now common in South African schools. Until Apartheid was abolished in 1994, whites and black could not attend the same schools. ?They're not conscious of race like we were growing up,? says Chris Blackburn, Matthew's father.

Filename
Post-Apartheid_011.jpg
Copyright
Julia Cumes
Image Size
1290x860 / 844.6KB
Contained in galleries
South Africa's First Apartheid Generation
Matthew Blackburn and his friends play eeny-meeny-miny-mo to decide who is "on" in a game of "catches" at Matthew's 7th birthday party at his family's home in Johannesburg, South Africa.  Matthew's social group is racially very mixed--a product of the integration that is now common in South African schools.  Until Apartheid was abolished in 1994, whites and black could not attend the same schools. ?They're not conscious of race like we were growing up,? says Chris Blackburn, Matthew's father.